Some things are difficult to say repeatedly in different ways, despite new information on that continues to appear over time. One of those things is the tie between early death rates and people who eat a meat-heavy, Standard American Diet. The ties are there, over and over, study after study, but some folks just don’t understand it. On the flip side, it’s hard to come up with new ways to say, “Vegetables are good for you.” So we’ll just come out and say it, on the cusp of a new study: vegetables are good for you.

This time, it’s again the combative ability of healthy vegetable fats and oils, like those found in nuts and olive oil, to fight cancer. A recent study suggests that men who are diagnosed with prostate cancer found their rates of growth slow, making it less likely that their disease spreads. What’s more, the absence of some carbohydrates seems to help drive that.

The crux of the research is this: By replacing 10 percent of your daily calories from carbohydrates with vegetable fat, a person has a 29 percent lower risk of lethal prostate cancer, and a 26 percent lower chance of dying from any cause. Those are good numbers.

But replacing those calories with other negatives, like saturated fat or trans fat, hurts the cause. The research showed when 5 percent of those calories were replaced with saturated fat, or just 1 percent with trans fat, the patients had a 25 to 30 percent higher risk of death.

Vegetable fats contain antioxidants that may reduce inflammation in the body, making the cancer harder to spread, according to Erin Richman, one of the researchers from University of California. This is especially important information considering one in six U.S. men are diagnosed with prostate cancer during their lifetime, and one in 36 die of the disease.

The recommendation? Men with prostate cancer should cut out simple sugars and processed foods, but not all fats should go. The “established benefit,” according to Richman, dictates adding more nuts and olive oil to the diet.

Some things are difficult to say repeatedly in different ways, despite new information on that continues to appear over time. One of those things is the tie between early death rates and people who eat a meat-heavy, Standard American Diet. The ties are there, over and over, study after study, but some folks just don’t understand it. On the flip side, it’s hard to come up with new ways to say, “Vegetables are good for you.” So we’ll just come out and say it, on the cusp of a new study: vegetables are good for you.

This time, it’s again the combative ability of healthy vegetable fats and oils, like those found in nuts and olive oil, to fight cancer. A recent study suggests that men who are diagnosed with prostate cancer found their rates of growth slow, making it less likely that their disease spreads. What’s more, the absence of some carbohydrates seems to help drive that.

The crux of the research is this: By replacing 10 percent of your daily calories from carbohydrates with vegetable fat, a person has a 29 percent lower risk of lethal prostate cancer, and a 26 percent lower chance of dying from any cause. Those are good numbers.

But replacing those calories with other negatives, like saturated fat or trans fat, hurts the cause. The research showed when 5 percent of those calories were replaced with saturated fat, or just 1 percent with trans fat, the patients had a 25 to 30 percent higher risk of death.

Vegetable fats contain antioxidants that may reduce inflammation in the body, making the cancer harder to spread, according to Erin Richman, one of the researchers from University of California. This is especially important information considering one in six U.S. men are diagnosed with prostate cancer during their lifetime, and one in 36 die of the disease.

The recommendation? Men with prostate cancer should cut out simple sugars and processed foods, but not all fats should go. The “established benefit,” according to Richman, dictates adding more nuts and olive oil to the diet.